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  • Sterling Silver Ammonite, Peanut Wood & Smokey Quartz Pendant

Sterling Silver Ammonite, Peanut Wood & Smokey Quartz Pendant

107.00 179.00
sale
IMG_20160428_151150076.jpg

Sterling Silver Ammonite, Peanut Wood & Smokey Quartz Pendant

107.00 179.00
sale

Sterling Silver pendant with peanut wood, polished ammonite, and two smoky quartz accents. 

L 2.75" x W 1.25"

Ammonites are one of the extinct groups of cephalopods that were prevalent during the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods.  They filled the seas much the same way fish fill our seas today. At the end of the Cretaceous period, they mysteriously vanished, and can be found as fossils around the world today.

Peanut wood is a very unique type of petrified wood that started out on the land in Western Australia.  Washed to sea as driftwood during the Cretaceous period, a clam species would gravitate to the wood and feed on the woody fibers, creating holes.  Over time the driftwood sunk to the bottom of the sea floor, and as radiolarons, tiny planktons with siliceous shells, would die the shells would fall to the bottom of the sea floor, filling those holes in the driftwood.  That area of Australia has been uplifted since the Cretaceous, and is now above sea level, where it has been collected and polished as gemmy material.

 

103-772

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Sterling Silver pendant with peanut wood, polished ammonite, and two smoky quartz accents. 

L 2.75" x W 1.25"

Ammonites are one of the extinct groups of cephalopods that were prevalent during the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods.  They filled the seas much the same way fish fill our seas today. At the end of the Cretaceous period, they mysteriously vanished, and can be found as fossils around the world today.

Peanut wood is a very unique type of petrified wood that started out on the land in Western Australia.  Washed to sea as driftwood during the Cretaceous period, a clam species would gravitate to the wood and feed on the woody fibers, creating holes.  Over time the driftwood sunk to the bottom of the sea floor, and as radiolarons, tiny planktons with siliceous shells, would die the shells would fall to the bottom of the sea floor, filling those holes in the driftwood.  That area of Australia has been uplifted since the Cretaceous, and is now above sea level, where it has been collected and polished as gemmy material.

 

103-772